• English Department


    English 9   1 Cr.

    This entry-level survey course is required for all ninth grade students. Students will study literature, writing, grammar, writing mechanics, and poetry.  Students will also read novels of fiction and study non-fiction texts.  Drama is taught through Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.  Students will be introduced to the idea of primary and secondary sources, along with synthesis writing, using the Document Based Question (DBQ) Project.  Students will utilize the writing process, relying heavily on technology with our 1:1 initiative, for pre-writing, drafting, revising, and a producing a final publishable document.  Grading will be determined by accumulating points on quizzes, tests, projects, papers, class discussions, and presentations. All grades will be weighted as follows: Reading 30%; Writing 30%; Speaking 30%; and daily work 10%.

    Honors 9 1 Cr.

    Students in this honors course are expected to have regular attendance, prepared for class daily, be articulate, and actively participate in class. It is important for students to complete work thoroughly and on time, with the exception of extenuating circumstances.  Although this is not necessary for enrollment, students enrolled in an Honors course are generally considered to be on a college prep path.  

    Students in Honors English 9 will study literature, writing, grammar, writing mechanics, and poetry.  Students will also read novels of fiction and study non-fiction texts.  Drama is taught through Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.  Students will be introduced to the idea of primary and secondary sources, along with synthesis writing, using the Document Based Question (DBQ) Project.  Students will utilize the writing process, relying heavily on technology with our 1:1 initiative, for pre-writing, drafting, revising, and a producing a final publishable document.  Grading will be determined by accumulating points on quizzes, tests, projects, papers, class discussions, and presentations. All grades will be weighted as follows: Reading 30%; Writing 30%; Speaking 30%; and daily work 10%.

    English 10   1 Cr.

    English 10 (World Literature)

    In English 10, students study literature from around the world. This course allows for the close study of literary works, as well as consideration of historical and cultural context. These units focus on geographical regions, themes, and literary forms that pertain to them. Thus students come to grasp the relationship between local concerns and universal questions. Students will also be introduced the difference between primary and secondary sources along with synthesis writing using the Document Based Question (DBQ) Project.  Students will utilize the writing process, relying heavily on technology with our 1:1 initiative, for pre-writing, drafting, revising, and producing a final, publishable document.  Grading will be determined by accumulating points on quizzes, tests, projects, papers, class discussions, and presentations. All grades will be weighted as follows: Reading 30%; Writing 30%; Speaking 30%; and daily work 10%.

    Honors 10 1 Cr.

    Honors English 10 (World Literature)

    Students in this honors course are expected to have regular attendance, prepared for class daily, be articulate, and actively participate in class. It is important for students to complete work thoroughly and on time, with the exception of extenuating circumstances.  Although this is not necessary for enrollment, students enrolled in an Honors course are generally considered to be on a college prep path.  

    In Honors English 10, students perform an intensive and accelerated study of literature from around the world. This course allows for the close study of literary works, as well as consideration of historical and cultural context. These units focus on geographical regions, themes, and literary forms that pertain to them. Thus students come to grasp the relationship between local concerns and universal questions. Students will also be introduced the difference between primary and secondary sources along with synthesis writing using the Document Based Question (DBQ) Project.  Students will utilize the writing process, relying heavily on technology with our 1:1 initiative, for pre-writing, drafting, revising, and producing a final, publishable document.  Grading will be determined by accumulating points on quizzes, tests, projects, papers, class discussions, and presentations. All grades will be weighted as follows: Reading 30%; Writing 30%; Speaking 30%; and daily work 10%.

    English 11   1 Cr.

    English 11 (American Literature)

    In eleventh grade, English students study American Literature.  Each unit allows for a close study of literary works, as well as consideration of historical and cultural contexts.  The units focus on themes and literary forms that pertain to them.  Students come to grasp the relationship between current issues, historical knowledge, and universal questions.  Students will begin to understand the difference between primary and secondary sources, along with synthesis writing, using the Document Based Question (DBQ) Project.  Students will utilize the writing process, relying heavily on technology with our 1:1 initiative, for pre-writing, drafting, revising, and producing a final publishable document.  Grading will be determined by accumulating points on quizzes, tests, projects, papers, class discussions, and presentations. All grades will be weighted as follows: Reading 30%; Writing 30%; Speaking 30%; and daily work 10%.

    Honors 11 1 Cr.

    Honors English 11 (American Literature)

    Students in this honors course are expected to have regular attendance, be prepared for class daily, be articulate, and actively participate in class. It is important for students to complete work thoroughly and on time, with the exception of extenuating circumstances.  Although this is not necessary for enrollment, students enrolled in an Honors course are generally considered to be on a college prep path.

    In Honors English 11, students study American Literature.  Each unit allows for a close study of literary works, historical and cultural contexts.  The units focus on themes and literary forms that pertain to them.  Students grasp the relationship between current issues, historical knowledge, and universal questions.  Students will begin to understand the difference between primary and secondary sources, along with synthesis writing, using the Document Based Question (DBQ) Project.  Students will utilize the writing process, relying heavily on technology with our 1:1 initiative, for pre-writing, drafting, revising, and producing a final, publishable document.  Grading will be determined by accumulating points on quizzes, tests, projects, papers, class discussions, and presentations. All grades will be weighted as follows: Reading 30%; Writing 30%; Speaking 30%; and daily work 10%.

    English 12   1 Cr.

    This course will study the structure of nonfiction text and essays, novels and film. Students will understand the difference between primary and secondary sources, along with synthesis writing using the Document Based Question (DBQ) Project.  Students will utilize the writing process, relying heavily on technology with our 1:1 initiative, for pre-writing, drafting, revising, and  producing a final publishable document.  Students will write several argumentative and informational research papers and complete an extensive capstone research project. An intense focus will be placed on grammar and mechanics, as well as transitioning students from high school to collegiate writing. Grading will be determined by accumulating points on quizzes, tests, projects, papers, class discussions, and presentations. All grades will be weighted as follows: Reading 30%; Writing 30%; Speaking 30%; and daily work 10%.

    Honors English 12 1 Cr

    Honors English 12 is designed to prepare you for the types of writing assignments you will encounter as college students so that you will be able to write academic essays with confidence and skill. The course is designed to operate like a college seminar course, which means you will be actively involved in class discussions, presentations, and projects throughout the entire year. All of these activities are modeled after assignments that you may encounter in a college classroom. You will also read and/or analyze a variety of texts, films, and other types of media. You will learn to format documents according to MLA and APA formatting styles required by most college classes. Since the majority of colleges use Microsoft Office, these programs will be utilized in this course to help you understand how they can enhance the writing process and how they will be used at the collegiate level. This course also prepares students to take the College Level Entrance Program Exam for college credit in College Composition. Passing this exam can give you college credit for your entry level composition course. This exam is available to be taken at most public university testing centers.

    AP English (12) 1 Cr.

    Prerequisite: “B” average in previous English courses.  AP Language and Composition is a course in both affective writing and critical reading skills. Writing skills will be developed through careful analysis of both prose and poetry selections. The goal of this course of study is to better prepare students for college-level instruction, especially college writing. Assignments include compositions that vary in approach in order to give students experience in writing different types of papers. Heavy emphasis is placed on class discussions.  The Advanced Placement Language Test for college credit will be offered in the spring.

    Public Speaking  (10-12)  .5 Cr.  (generally 1st semester)

    This course is designed to study and practice informative and persuasive public speaking, including communication modeling and variables, speech preparation, extemporaneous method, nonverbal communication, audience adaptation, and performance apprehension.   

    Students will use a variety of technology to complete different assessments and course work throughout the semester.  During the term, students will complete a variety of assignments using Microsoft Word.  Students will also use the Internet to gain valuable information for researching topics and understand the difference between a credible web site and a commercial web site.  Students will use PowerPoint to create and present a variety of assessments.

    Literature and Film (10-12)   .5 Cr.  (generally 2nd semester)

    This course is designed to study a variety of genres of film and corresponding literature when applicable.

    Journalism (10-12)  1 Cr. Must complete application to enroll

    This course encompasses the creation and publication of the school newspaper, otherwise known as the Shark Scene. Students will be treated as if they are employees working for business and are expected to devote out-of-school time to the Shark Scene. The course requires students to meet deadlines for publication on a multi-media platform including both print, still photos, and video.

    Yearbook  (10-12)  1 Cr. Must complete application to enroll

    Yearbook priority given to upperclassmen. All members of the yearbook staff will be responsible for the total production of the current book. This will include selling advisements to local businesses, writing creative copy, designing layouts on desktop publishing, meeting headlines, and selling books. Emphasis is placed on creative writing of captions, headlines and copy. Students must be willing to put in extra time to meet publisher-imposed deadlines.